Director of Marketing Analytics

Folks tend not to leave FlowPlay – so jump on this new opening while you can.

It’s been a minute – as the kids say – since we last did an announcement for FlowPlay, a Pioneer Square video-game and virtual-world developer.

There’s a good reason why it’s been a while: Once people join this company, they stay there.

Part of it, I’m sure, is the inherent allure of the work itself. Again, we’re talking here about a company that creates video games and virtual worlds – anyone still in touch with their inner 11-year-old (and I sincerely hope, Dear Reader, that you are still among them) can understand the attraction of that.

But there’s another reason why people stick around at FlowPlay, and that’s its culture. The company has described its workplace as one that takes work/play/life balance seriously,” and where “play is prized, and creativity is king.”

This ethos shows itself in such perks as having only two office-mandated days per week, and a minimal-hierarchy office structure in which people work in teams rather than in fixed bureaucratic silos.

Now FlowPlay is looking to add a Director of Marketing Analytics. At the heart of this role is the management of a new internal analytics product that allows FlowPlay’s game designers to perpetually adjust the campaigns in its mega-selling multi-platform games such as Vegas World.

The responsibilities include designing and running A/B tests and other diagnostics, working closely with the engineering and business-intelligence teams to maximize the value of the data generated by this new system.

For this position, FlowPlay is looking for eight to ten years of experience in marketing, data analytics, or business intelligence, as well as a background in statistics; data science; A/B testing; and machine learning or artificial intelligence.

In addition, some exposure to data visualization tools such as Tableau or Power BI would be quite helpful – as would knowledge of relational databases and SQL, and of Python, R, or other programming languages used for data analysis.

As mentioned above, slots like this don’t just open up every day – take advantage of this opportunity!

PS From PSP: It may seem funny to raise this subject at the end of an announcement for a company with such an informal vibe, but I’ve been thinking more and more lately about whether our sense of balance between casualness and formality in the workplace has gotten all out of whack after nearly three years of a global pandemic.

Clearly, companies like FlowPlay are Exhibit A for how the casual approach can really work for certain firms, in certain sectors. An overly formal or structured approach absolutely would not work in such cases.

But I’ve spoken with more than a few folks in the business world who have noted instances of employees, job seekers, and even fellow managers who seem to have misplaced their instinct for skillful self-presentation or, in some cases, basic courtesy for others – and that this seems to have become a bit more common as the pandemic has progressed.

What do you think? Has the shift toward greater casualness in workplace dress and manner during the pandemic gone too far? If so, are performance or productivity suffering in any way as a result? And does it even really matter anymore – especially during a protracted period of tight labor markets? Your thoughts, please! ###

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